In case of emergency: CPR for Dogs

Emergencies can happen with any pet, young or old. And while we hope you never have to administer CPR to your pet, knowing what to do in an emergency situation could have lifesaving results.
CPR, or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, is a combination of chest compression and simulated respiration. It is generally used if your dogs’ heart stops beating. A dog’s heart can stop beating as a result from not breathing. Once a dog stops breathing, their heart will go into cardiac arrest and stop.
The goal of CPR is to get your dog to start breathing on their own and have their heart start beating again.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
for puppies/ dogs less than 30 pounds (14 kg)

1. Lay the dog on a flat surface with his/her right side against the surface.
2. Cup your palms and hold the dog with one palm on either side above the heart region. (You can also place your thumb on one side of his chest and keep the fingers on the other side.)
3. Compress the chest for one inch to one-quarter or one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 100 compressions in a minute.
4. If only one person is available, breathe into the dog’s nose once for every five compressions that are done. If two persons are available, give artificial respiration once every two or three compressions are done.
5. Continue with the CPR and artificial respiration until the dog begins
breathing on its own and the pulse becomes steady.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
for medium/large dogs weighing more than 30 lb (14 kg)

1. Lay the dog on a flat surface with his/her right side against the surface. (You will need to stand towards the dog’s back.)
2. Put one of your palms on the dog’s rib cage, near the heart region, and put your other palm on top of it.
Without bending both the elbows, press the rib cage in a downward motion.
3. Compress the chest for one-quarter to one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 80 compressions per minute.
4. Close the muzzle with your hand before beginning artificial respiration. If only one person is available, breathe into the dog’s nose once for every five compressions that are done. If two persons are available, give artificial respiration once for every two compressions are done.
5. Continue with the CPR and artificial respiration until the dog begins breathing on its own and the pulse becomes steady.

Pets Inside!
Having a cling on your front window or door with your pet’s information can also have lifesaving effects. In emergencies, such as a house fire, pets become very afraid and tend to hide. Having your pets listed and their names will allow someone to try to call them out of your house.

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